Complete Lower Extremity Healthcare

140 Traders Way
Pooler, GA   31322

(912) 330 - 8885

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By The Foot & Ankle Center, PC
April 04, 2018
Category: Injury Prevention

It’s a new season and that means new sports for children and adults as well as changes in fitness routines. Here at The Foot & Ankle Center, PC we want to see that our patients get off on the right foot. Below are a few simple steps will help you prevent sports injuries and hit your stride early in the season:

  1. Assess your fitness level. Be honest: have you or your children spent the winter months in a more sedentary fashion? If yes, then it’s important to prep for the upcoming sports season by getting muscles warmed up. Before practices begin or you start a new running program, spend some time walking, stretching and just generally being more active. Injuries such as Achilles tendonitis and even stress fractures in the foot are often the result of a sudden increase in activity and strain on the feet and ankles.
  2. Examine your shoes. For children, it’s inevitable that the pair of shoes they used for softball or tennis last year is not going to fit this year. For adults, you should inspect the tread of your shoes and look for any tears or rough spots. Shoes that are overly flexible (able to bend completely in half or twist all the way around) will not support your foot and need to be replaced.
  3. Deal with chronic foot problems. If you have bunions, flat feet, plantar fasciitis, chronic ankle instability, or another ongoing foot issue, have your foot examined by our podiatrist, Dr. Leonard M. Talarico, before starting a new exercise activity or sport. The foot doctor will check to see if a chronic foot condition has progressed and also be able to make recommendations about shoes or custom orthotics that may increase comfort and performance.
  4. Choose the right program. Make sure that the program you or your child is embarking on follows sound exercise principles and safe training protocols. There should be warm-ups and stretching before and after activity. Workouts can be challenging but not push a person to the point where they are in pain or at risk of injury. Inspect field, court or other surfaces where the activity will take place and speak up about repairs necessary to prevent trips, falls and ankle sprains.

If, as you start a new sport or fitness plan, you experience recurring pain or other symptoms, contact our Pooler, GA office for an appointment by calling: (912) 330–8885.

By The Foot & Ankle Center, PC
February 14, 2018

At The Foot & Ankle Center, PC, we treat patients of all ages. One group that has its own unique conditions and concerns are children. Children are very active, not always very concerned with good hygiene, and their feet are growing and developing rapidly. These characteristics make them more prone to these specific foot health issues:

Plantar Wart—caused by the human papilloma virus, these warts usually develop on the bottom of the foot. You may not notice a wart in this location until your child begins to complain of pain in the foot. Plantar warts grow deep into the skin and can make it uncomfortable for your child to walk or stand. Warts (along with athlete’s foot and fungal infections) are spread by direct contact. Encourage your child not to go barefoot (especially in public places) and not to share shoes, socks, towels and other items that touch another child’s feet.

Ingrown Toenails—children tend to peel the tips of their toenails off rather than wait for a parent to trim them. This can result in a nail that starts to grow down and into the skin. Children’s feet grow very fast and often times they may be wearing shoes that are too tight for a while before a parent realizes they need a bigger size. This squeezing together of the toes also increases the risk for ingrown nails. If the nail actually breaks the skin an infection can develop.

Pediatric Flatfoot—when children are toddlers and first begin to walk, the arch of their foot is not always obvious due to baby fat. In young children, an arch should be visible but flat feet can be difficult for a parent to detect. An awkward appearance when your child runs or walks may be a tip-off as well as complaints of cramping or pain in their feet, knees or legs.

Sever’s Disease—not actually a disease at all but rather a painful inflammation of the growth plate at the back of the heel. Sever’s disease most often affects children between the ages of 8 and 14 and can be caused when there is excessive and repetitive stress on the heel from sports or other activities.

“Growing pains” are a myth and no pain in the foot is normal. If your child says they have pain in their feet or ankles or you notice them limping, walking strangely or not wanting to participate in physical activities, contact our Pooler office for an appointment by calling: (912) 330–8885. Our podiatrist, Dr. Leonard M. Talarico, will diagnose the problem and prescribe the correct treatment to get your child back to the active life they love.

Do you find your initial enthusiasm for getting in shape in 2018 is starting to flag? At The Foot & Ankle Center, PC, we find that many patients start off strong with a new exercise routine right after New Year’s but by the end of the month are calling us with foot and ankle complaints. Below are some do’s and don’ts to help you stay on track with your fitness goals:

Do: get any old injuries or chronic foot problems checked before immersing yourself in a new fitness routine. Our podiatrist, Dr. Leonard M. Talarico, will evaluate the current condition of your feet and ankles and make recommendations about the best ways for you to get in shape without harming your feet. Some conditions such as flat feet or plantar fasciitis may require an orthotic insert to make exercise comfortable.

Don’t: try to do too much too soon. Patients who start exercising after being inactive for a significant period of time need to begin slowly and gradually build up the intensity and duration of their workouts. Many foot disorders such as Achilles tendonitis and shin splints are directly related to sudden increases in activity.

Do: inspect your footwear. If you plan to use sports shoes that you already own, be sure that they are appropriate for the activity you plan to do (running shoes are designed differently from tennis sneakers, for example) and that they are in good shape. Shoes that are stretched or have loose stitching or other signs of wear can cause an injury. Many good intentions to get in shape have been derailed by a painful blister caused by a shoe that doesn’t fit properly.

Do: warm up before and after you work out. Properly preparing your muscles for exercise and then cooling down and stretching will safeguard your feet and ankles from injuries.

Don’t: forget the water bottle. Staying hydrated will help reduce the risk of swelling (edema) in your lower legs and ankles and increase your comfort level during and after exercise.

Don’t: ignore pain. If, despite taking all of the above steps, your new exercise plan is causing you pain in your toes, ankles or feet, contact our Pooler, GA office for an appointment by calling: (912)330-8885. We’ll help you determine the source of the pain and get you moving forward with your exercise goals.

By The Foot & Ankle Center, PC
November 21, 2017
Category: Foot Pain

A condition that patients come to us with at The Foot & Ankle Center, PC that can be a little tricky to diagnose at first is tarsal tunnel syndrome. The tarsal tunnel is a narrow space on the inside of the ankle near the ankle bone that houses veins, arteries, tendons and nerves. When a nerve in the tunnel known as the posterior tibial nerve gets squeezed or compressed, it can result in pain and discomfort. The problem is that the pain can manifest in a number of different ways. Symptoms include tingling, burning or a feeling similar to an electrical shock, pain (at times shooting) and numbness. These symptoms may come on suddenly and can be felt on the inside of the ankle, the bottom of the foot or both. For some patients the sensations may be confined to one particular spot, while in others they may include the toes, arch, heel and calf. Causes of tarsal tunnel syndrome are often related to overuse—beginning a new exercise program or increasing the intensity of an existing one; prolonged periods of standing or walking. Other causes include:

  • Flat feet
  • Another structure in the tunnel that has become enlarged and is compressing the nerve, such as a cyst or varicose vein
  • Disease such as arthritis or diabetes that are associated with swelling
  • An ankle injury

Getting Relief from Nerve Pain

Once our podiatrist, Dr. Leonard M. Talarico, diagnoses tarsal tunnel syndrome there are several treatment options available. Conservative measures include:

  • Resting the injured foot to allow for healing and prevent further damage
  • Oral or injection medications to reduce inflammation and pain
  • Icing the painful area
  • Immobilizing the foot with a cast
  • Custom orthotic inserts to give arch support and reduce pressure on the nerve
  • Physical therapy to alleviate symptoms
  • Bracing

In some cases a surgery to relieve the compression is the best way to treat tarsal tunnel syndrome. Your foot doctor will review treatment options with you and determine the best plan for you. If you are experiencing tarsal tunnel symptoms, contact our Pooler, GA office for an appointment today by calling: (912) 330–8885.

At The Foot & Ankle Center, PC we know that it can be difficult for parents to detect and analyze foot problems in children. Young children in particular may not be able to articulate where it hurts or what doesn’t feel right in their feet. Look for clues that they may be experiencing a foot problem:

  • Not wanting to play sports or participate in activities he or she normally enjoys
  • Limping
  • Walking on tip toes
  • An awkward gait when running or walking
  • Complaints of pain

Common Pediatric Foot Problems

Although many foot disorders that affect adults can also strike children, there are a few conditions that occur more frequently in children. These include:

Sever’s Disease—this disorder is characterized by severe pain in the heel. In children ages 8-15 the growth plate is not fully developed, leaving a weak area at the back of the heel that can become inflamed with repetitive stress.

Pediatric Flatfoot—many babies and toddlers appear to have flatfeet when they first start to walk but as baby fat diminishes and they mature the arch develops more fully. If a flatfoot condition exists it may become painful or children may complain of cramping in their feet or their knees and legs.

Ingrown Toenails—children’s feet grow so fast that parents may not notice that shoes and socks have become too tight. Cramped quarters can force toenails to start to grow back into the skin at the edges of the nail bed. As the nail penetrates the skin it can become red, swollen and very painful. It’s also possible for an infection to occur at the site.

Warts, Fungal and Bacterial Infections—all of these problems are spread by direct contact with the virus, bacteria or fungi causing the condition. Children are famous for sharing shoes and socks, using the same towel as their friends and going barefoot in public places such as community pools, beach bathrooms and changing areas.

Get in the habit of checking your children’s feet regularly. If you notice anything unusual or your child experiences any foot pain that lasts more than a few days, have their feet evaluated by our podiatrist, Dr. Leonard M. Talarico. Contact our Pooler office for an appointment by calling: (912) 330-8885.










 

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140 Traders Way
Pooler, GA 31322

Podiatrist / Foot Surgeon - Pooler / Savannah • Leonard M. Talarico, DPM • 140 Traders Way • Pooler GA  31322 • 912-330-8885