Complete Lower Extremity Healthcare

140 Traders Way
Pooler, GA   31322

(912) 330 - 8885

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Do you find your initial enthusiasm for getting in shape in 2018 is starting to flag? At The Foot & Ankle Center, PC, we find that many patients start off strong with a new exercise routine right after New Year’s but by the end of the month are calling us with foot and ankle complaints. Below are some do’s and don’ts to help you stay on track with your fitness goals:

Do: get any old injuries or chronic foot problems checked before immersing yourself in a new fitness routine. Our podiatrist, Dr. Leonard M. Talarico, will evaluate the current condition of your feet and ankles and make recommendations about the best ways for you to get in shape without harming your feet. Some conditions such as flat feet or plantar fasciitis may require an orthotic insert to make exercise comfortable.

Don’t: try to do too much too soon. Patients who start exercising after being inactive for a significant period of time need to begin slowly and gradually build up the intensity and duration of their workouts. Many foot disorders such as Achilles tendonitis and shin splints are directly related to sudden increases in activity.

Do: inspect your footwear. If you plan to use sports shoes that you already own, be sure that they are appropriate for the activity you plan to do (running shoes are designed differently from tennis sneakers, for example) and that they are in good shape. Shoes that are stretched or have loose stitching or other signs of wear can cause an injury. Many good intentions to get in shape have been derailed by a painful blister caused by a shoe that doesn’t fit properly.

Do: warm up before and after you work out. Properly preparing your muscles for exercise and then cooling down and stretching will safeguard your feet and ankles from injuries.

Don’t: forget the water bottle. Staying hydrated will help reduce the risk of swelling (edema) in your lower legs and ankles and increase your comfort level during and after exercise.

Don’t: ignore pain. If, despite taking all of the above steps, your new exercise plan is causing you pain in your toes, ankles or feet, contact our Pooler, GA office for an appointment by calling: (912)330-8885. We’ll help you determine the source of the pain and get you moving forward with your exercise goals.

By The Foot & Ankle Center P.C.
June 18, 2014
Category: Foot Care

Back To School FootwearBackpacks, paper, pencils and clothes are just a few of the things your youngster may need before the start of a new school year. When shopping for your child during back-to-school season and throughout the year, don’t forget to add proper fitting shoes to your shopping list.  

Your child’s feet are rapidly changing and growing. In fact, feet grow so fast when kids are young that parents are often surprised at how often they need to change shoes sizes to accommodate the growth.  

According to the American Podiatric Medical Association, parents should consider a few things when selecting shoes for their little one. Remember these tips the next time you buy a new pair of shoes for your child:

  • Proper size. Poor-fitting footwear can lead to irritation and other problems, so always measure your child’s feet before buying a new pair of shoes.  Because feet are seldom the same size, always buy shoes for your child’s larger foot.
     
  • Avoid sharing shoes.  Hand-me-down shoes can spread fungi such as nail fungus and athlete’s foot.
     
  • Index finger. As a general rule, leave an index finger's width from the top of the big toe to the end of the shoe.
     
  • Breathing room. Buy shoes made of natural, breathable fabrics that are soft and pliable like your child’s feet.
     
  • Test them out. Always bring your child with you to the store to try on shoes before purchasing a new pair. When testing out shoes, the child should wear the socks that they would normally wear to ensure proper fit.  Have your child walk around the store for comfort and fit.
     
  • Examine the shoe itself.Your child’s shoe should have a firm heel counter, adequate cushioning of the insole, good flexibility and a built-in arch.

Feet are an important, but often overlooked, part of the body.  Since kids’ feet are soft and pliable, they are subject to abnormal pressures at a young age that can easily cause foot problems and deformity.  By promoting healthy footwear choices and consulting your Pooler podiatrist whenever you suspect your child has a foot problem, you can ensure healthy development of feet.

By The Foot & Ankle Center P.C
November 15, 2012
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Footwear  

HeelsWhile high heel shoes may look stylish or complement your favorite outfit, they are rarely the best option for a woman's feet. According to a study by the American Podiatric Medical Association, 39 percent of women wear high heels every day; of the women who wear heels daily, three out of four reported foot problems. Despite the numbers, many women continue to underestimate the health risks associated with high heels.

High heel shoes disrupt the body's alignment, crowd the toes and force the body's weight onto the ball of the foot. Wearing heels can contribute to a variety of foot and ankle problems, including:

  • Achilles tendonitis. The Achilles tendon and calf muscles tighten and shorten as the front of the foot moves down in relation to the heel. This causes stress and painful inflammation of the Achilles tendon.
  • Bunions. Narrow-toed shoes can cause a bony growth on the joint at the base of the big toe. The bunion forces the big toe to slant in toward the other toes, resulting in discomfort, blisters, corns and calluses.
  • Hammertoes. A narrow toe box crowds the smaller toes into a bent, claw-like position at the middle joint.
  • Metatarsalgia. Continued high heel wear can lead to joint pain in the ball of the foot as a result of heels forcing the body's weight to be redistributed.
  • Ankle injuries. Because heels impair balance and increase the risk of falling, ankle sprains and fractures are common.
  • Pump Bump. The rigid back of a pump-style shoe can cause pressure that irritates the heel bone, creating a bony enlargement known as Haglund's deformity.
  • Neuromas. A narrow toe box and high heel can compress and create a thickening of tissue around a nerve between the third and fourth toes, leading to pain and numbness in the toes.

Still not willing to ditch the heels? There are ways to relieve some of the damaging effects of high heels.

  • Avoid heels taller than 2 inches
  • Choose thicker, more stable heels. Thicker heels are still stylish, plus they lessen the stress on your feet and provide better shock absorption.
  • If you must wear heels, wear your gym shoes or flats for commuting and change into your heels once you arrive to your destination.
  • Stretch and massage your calf, heel, and foot muscles. This helps relax the muscles and tendons and prevents them from tightening and shortening.
  • Avoid shoes with pointed toes

High heel shoes can cause pain and foot deformities that can last a lifetime. So the next time you go to slip on your heels for a long day at work or a night out, consider the consequences and rethink your options. If foot pain persists, visit The Foot & Ankle Center P.C for treatment.










 

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140 Traders Way
Pooler, GA 31322

Podiatrist / Foot Surgeon - Pooler / Savannah • Leonard M. Talarico, DPM • 140 Traders Way • Pooler GA  31322 • 912-330-8885